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Author Topic: Too much music; we are reaching the saturation point  (Read 1956 times)
rcjordan
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« on: April 08, 2009, 12:38:15 PM »

"The average American hears more than five hours of music per day, yet a new survey suggests that American teenagers actually consumed and shared 19 per cent less music in 2008 than they did a year ago. CD sales were down (28 per cent) but download sales also fell (13 per cent) and even illegal downloads declined (six per cent). More pertinently, borrowing and swapping music between friends was down 28 per cent. Thirty two per cent of teens expressed discontent with the music available for purchase, while 23 per cent said they already have a large enough collection of music. Is it possible we are reaching some kind of saturation point?"
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/culturecritics/neilmccormick/5125923/Is-there-too-much-music.html

I say yes. (I also see a similar saturation in sports.)  I think that over-supply is largely behind the decline of music sales, though pirating amplified it (just another gate in the supply channel).
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vsloathe
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« Reply #1 on: April 08, 2009, 12:41:29 PM »

I was thinking about this last night as Slacker and Pandora radio were introducing me to small metal bands that I had never heard before.

I mean over the past couple of years I went from having just a couple of favorite bands (Bad Religion, In Flames, As I Lay Dying) to having hundreds of bands, amongst which I would find it difficult to pick just one or two (though BR is always #1 Smiley ).

There is a saturation point, for sure. I'm not a good example though, because I've stopped listening to so much music, and composing a bit more of my own recently.
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rcjordan
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« Reply #2 on: April 08, 2009, 12:59:57 PM »

>I'm not a good example though, because

Funny how many times that phrase is used when trends are being dissected, VS. Collapse of newspapers, tv, etc. is a sort of death-by-papercuts, don't you think? At the micro level, none of us are particularly good examples. But, in total...

I believe decline in perceived value is the main culprit here. If it's omnipresent and free or nearly free, how can it be worth my time?
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jammaster82
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« Reply #3 on: April 08, 2009, 01:43:23 PM »

I just think we showed the world with gnutella how we wanted to get our music and they responded with RIAA and lawsuits..

like south park says.. poor lars ulrich.. he has to wait and finance his new in pool bar and work to make the payments instead of dropping the cash and doing blow while the workers work on his paradise.

we as listeners were held hostage i mean two cd sets could all fit on one cd and with mpeg layer 3 technology and the p2p dcom concepts the internet took a hold of our economy and thats where the real exchange is all happening now.... i mean why not just give it to us all on one cd .. oh yeah to make those assholes richer, i remember now.

shit i know someone that downloaded a baby from china.  the economy is on the interenet... the people burning gas to go squat in a cubicle are just youtubing it and play by playing grays anatomy anyway and not doing a damn thing that makes their bosses money while they watch the clock and produce no real value. 

Make yourr boss money, and he will pay you.  I guess all the gossip and sitcom recapping aint doing shit for the businesses these people work at.

give me a bar full of drunk irish people playing folk music any day over yahni....id just as soon copy a copy of a grateful dead show recording and hear some legit live 'open source' music played from the soul rather than tune in to the inexorable din of fruity looped jungle shit thats out there on the waves now... give me some self medicated jam stuff for free any day... come on now, we paid 13$ a cd for a while and bought mp3 players for 500$ but i had a pretty decent .wav like sample of hhotel california on my atari 800 so wheres the luv technology people.  Guess they milked us down to nothing and our teats are dry.

 its about time metallica went to work like the rest of us... poor lars, smoking middies out of a pinch hitter now instead of the ultra dank sensi cannabis cup winning prize bud out of a volcano.

 

im just sayin'
« Last Edit: April 08, 2009, 01:46:10 PM by jammaster82 » Logged

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rcjordan
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« Reply #4 on: April 08, 2009, 02:17:59 PM »

>milked us down to nothing and our teats are dry

There's some of that, to be sure.  But I'm getting a sense of that the drive to consume music is diminishing overall, or perhaps a better word would be "dulled." But "saturation point" may describe it even better. The numbers above seem to confirm that, whatever the cause, the effect is showing up in sales.   
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