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Author Topic: Red bull pilot takes a dunk  (Read 2614 times)
dee
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« on: March 28, 2012, 04:00:17 AM »

Perk...I know you like aviation. check this out. This guys brown noise generator must have been at full tilt when he hit

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xkwKqD9ylLo&feature=g-vrec&context=G221516bRVAAAAAAAABg

Very lucky to get away with it.
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perkiset
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« Reply #1 on: March 28, 2012, 09:42:04 AM »

Hoooholy shit that was close ... you're right, unreal that he managed to pull that one out. Cheers Dee
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It is now believed, that after having lived in one compound with 3 wives and never leaving the house for 5 years, Bin Laden called the U.S. Navy Seals himself.
daviator
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« Reply #2 on: March 28, 2012, 09:44:40 PM »

Those planes are so unbelievably overpowered, that so long as the engine didn't quit, firewalling the throttle would have almost instantly given him enough airspeed to be flying again, even against a little momentary drag from the water.  A lesser plane wouldn't have been so lucky.  Of course, it also takes a good pilot to react correctly and immediately use the correct control inputs to counter the force from the wingtip that dragged the water.  I probably wouldn't have been so lucky (but I wouldn't have put myself into that situation, lol...)
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dee
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« Reply #3 on: March 29, 2012, 10:28:54 AM »

Yep...crazy. As you say, to counteract that drag that quickly was pretty on it. Think he got a bit lucky though aswell in the fact that he hit pretty flat so the leading edge didn't dig in. Think I would have been getting wet and hurt very quickly.
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perkiset
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« Reply #4 on: March 29, 2012, 11:02:44 AM »

Yeah man, that coulda went way more south pretty quickly, were it not for his skill, decision making and power of the plane as DV8R points out.

I'll betcha though, that even with his experience, he had to change his pantaloons before attending the post-race party... Wink
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It is now believed, that after having lived in one compound with 3 wives and never leaving the house for 5 years, Bin Laden called the U.S. Navy Seals himself.
nutballs
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« Reply #5 on: March 30, 2012, 07:49:17 AM »

His body language change in the cockpit vid is cool. He's all biz until he says "I'm alright" then starts doing the adrenaline exhale. Also that he immediately got out of the race path.
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I could eat a bowl of Alphabet Soup and shit a better argument than that.
daviator
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« Reply #6 on: March 30, 2012, 01:05:37 PM »

I've had a couple of particularly stressful and challenging situations in the plane over the years, and that's how it works for me, too: all business and handling the situation until I'm safely on the ground.  Pull off the runway, and then start to tremble and all of the "what if?" and "OMG" stuff starts going through your mind.  Up until that point, no panic at all.  It's actually an interesting experience, it's like your subconscious tells your body and brain, "ok, you're safe to freak out now."

I've always been grateful that I'm someone who can compartmentalize and not panic in the moment, because I'm not sure that's a skill you can learn.  There are pilots who, when encountering a hairy situation, go into panic mode, can't focus, and often end up with quite unsatisfactory results.  I think the "panic" or "stay calm and deal with it" personalities are pretty much hard-wired in us, and we see them in any kind of scary or stressful situation, not just aviation.  I think we all know people who are good to have on your side during a crisis, and those who just make things worse.

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nutballs
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« Reply #7 on: March 30, 2012, 03:00:07 PM »

that "panic deferment" is actually a common trait in survivors. The phrase "panic kills" is 100% true imo.
I have that trait as well. I think a lot more men than women have it. Not sure why that is? But my experience says it's that way.
Loss of vehicle control related car accidents seemed to have way more women than men. Of course men made up for it 10 fold with driving-like-a-jackass accidents.
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daviator
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« Reply #8 on: March 30, 2012, 05:34:31 PM »

The other thing that's interesting is that I don't really think there's any way to tell how you will respond in a crisis until you face one.  So someone that hasn't ever been in a situation where their life was literally on the line and decisions and actions needed to be made and taken almost instantly they probably don't know whether they are going to freak out or not.  I'm pretty sure I didn't know, for sure, before the first time I was tested in that way. 

If there was a way to test for this trait, I'd go so far as to suggest that people who panic when things go wrong probably are not suited to do things like fly airplanes and perhaps shouldn't even be allowed to.  It's certainly as or more important a potential disability than many of the other things that will medically ground someone.

Of course, if they could test for that, they might be able to test for whatever causes Jet Blue pilots to suffer a mid-flight mental breakdown.
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dee
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« Reply #9 on: March 31, 2012, 04:04:16 AM »

Quote
The other thing that's interesting is that I don't really think there's any way to tell how you will respond in a crisis until you face one.  So someone that hasn't ever been in a situation where their life was literally on the line and decisions and actions needed to be made and taken almost instantly they probably don't know whether they are going to freak out or not.  I'm pretty sure I didn't know, for sure, before the first time I was tested in that way. 

If there was a way to test for this trait, I'd go so far as to suggest that people who panic when things go wrong probably are not suited to do things like fly airplanes and perhaps shouldn't even be allowed to.  It's certainly as or more important a potential disability than many of the other things that will medically ground someone.

Yep. Any military training especially is designed to weed those people out pretty early on.You just get thrown in the shit from the get go. As you say, you really need a certain diposition in those situations to be any good.Loads of aero pilots are current or ex fast jet jocks.  You wouldn't be much good to anyone if everytime you had an engine failure on takeoff you covered your eyes and screamed like a little girl. Having that ability helps in all types of situations. Keeping control and thinking fast is just as valid when some muppet decides to flail wildly at you in a club/pub, or seeing that if your 3 year old kid is running on a path that is going to intercept with a car in 10 secs.
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