The Cache: Technology Expert's Forum
 
*
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register. September 21, 2019, 06:51:46 AM

Login with username, password and session length


Pages: [1]
  Print  
Author Topic: Help: Suggest some website management software.  (Read 2228 times)
nutballs
Administrator
Lifer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5627


Back in my day we had 9 planets


View Profile
« on: March 30, 2010, 08:48:35 PM »

Ok, this is probably not the right crowd for this, but I will ask anyway...


Anyone point me to some web site management software that uses templates and works on the client side. Then spits out a static HTML site?

I am going to check on the current capabilities of DW but frankly I am WAY out of the loop on this. I have a client who needs to be able to generate content pages, but then also potentially put a new template on it and spit it out again.

Of course I have MY tools for this, but they aint exactly user friendly... This is a hands on, content generation project.

Any other thoughts beside DW?
Logged

I could eat a bowl of Alphabet Soup and shit a better argument than that.
kurdt
Lifer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1153


paha arkkitehti


View Profile
« Reply #1 on: March 30, 2010, 11:08:55 PM »

There's plenty of these but not a single one usable Smiley

DW is just horrible, I mean horrible. But that's just my framework designing coder brain talking.

You didn't specify it the client is a Mac or Win user. There's Rapidweaver for Mac that should be easy enough for any client which isn't the case with DW Smiley
Logged

I met god and he had nothing to say to me.
rcjordan
Lifer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 882


View Profile
« Reply #2 on: March 31, 2010, 05:11:44 AM »

>this is probably not the right crowd for this

On the contrary, you may be asking at the only place that'll give you a solution --though I doubt you'll take me up on it.   


Here's a cut-n-paste of a short review I did over at threadwatch a couple of years ago:

One of the best thought-out "basic engines" for content management I've run across is Joel Spoelsky's CityDesk (http://www.fogcreek.com/CityDesk/) . That said, I'd only recommend it for those who are familiar with a bit of scripting and going to use its guts to roll their own cms shell. However, development is dead, so it's "as-is."

#1 - It's CLIENTSIDE (WIN)

If you're a lonewolf type and no one but you is going to touch the keyboard when it comes to site data then for certain sites (not all) the only thing you repeat is ftp time ...and CityDesk does the sync to server automatically.

Having the data clientside means that no one can crack the database and there's a better backup capability if all data flows from the desktop --and in CityDesk's case, a single source file (it even wraps up the graphics inside the source file).

#2 - Writes static
For heavy-traffic sites the heavy-lifting cpu work is done once on the desktop, not every time someone or somebot runs through the server.

If it goes up as static I could give a rat's derriere if mysql or even the cgi-bin goes belly-up, the site still runs ...a point some high-traffic sites will (or will learn to) appreciate.

#3 - What it does best, IMO, is handle/manage (clientside) includes.

#4 - It has its own, onboard scripting language. That language is simplistic and many times you will want to throw your desktop in the trashcan because of the hellatious programmatic cartwheels you'll have to employ. That said, if you manage to come out of the process with an end product it will be onehelluva product.

Though I don't use it, it also allows "post-processing" by other applications prior to ftp.


#5 - CityDesk happens to import small-to-midsize legacy sites extraordinarily well and for just about any type of file, since you define the extensions in your template table. So it would allow you to quickly employ some sort of CMS capabilities on and gain control of (in incremental steps of your own choosing) an old jumblesite.

# 6 - Since everything is processed clientside this eliminates any special hosting requirements or server tuning so that I'd be able to change hosting services for large-ish content sites about as quickly as the dns propagates.

#7 - Can be template-driven, manual, or any combination. Templates (you have a "template" for manually-built pages) are assigned at the page level. File type extensions are assigned to the template.

#8 - It's very buggy, but it's still BY FAR the best app I've found for static page development, warts and all. Use at your own risk. It's also $275 or thereabouts, which puts some off. Crippleware version is available for testing, I think.

I'll add that anyone expecting CityDesk to be a "normal" database in terms of defined tables and fields will be in for a shock. I suspect that's one reason that it never took off as a commercial cms. It's part file manager, part article manager, and part database.
Logged
nutballs
Administrator
Lifer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5627


Back in my day we had 9 planets


View Profile
« Reply #3 on: March 31, 2010, 11:05:48 AM »

wow thanks RC. I am downloading the starter version now. Sounds like it will fit the bill though from your detailed overview. Thanks much. I will try to remember to post back my findings on it.
Logged

I could eat a bowl of Alphabet Soup and shit a better argument than that.
Pages: [1]
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Perkiset's Place Home   Best of The Cache   phpMyIDE: MySQL Stored Procedures, Functions & Triggers
Politics @ Perkiset's   Pinkhat's Perspective   
cache
mart
coder
programmers
ajax
php
javascript
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.2 | SMF © 2006-2007, Simple Machines LLC
Seo4Smf v0.2 © Webmaster's Talks


Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!